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Welcome to USD 310 - Fairfield Schools

DATES TO REMEMBER

Sunday
1/14
FFA Stock Show in Denver
Monday
1/15
NO SCHOOL - Teacher inservice at Fairfield
Martin Luther King Day
FFA Stock Show in Denver
Burrton Tournament (FHS boys) TBA
 Tuesday
1/16
NO SCHOOL DUE TO BAD WEATHER
FFA Stock Show in Denver
Burrton Tournament (FHS boys) TBA
 Wednesday
1/17
Spelling Bee
  FES at 9:00 am
  FMS at 11:00 am
FFA Stock Show in Denver
 Thursday
1/18
Fort Hays State University presentation during seminar
Burrton Tournament (FHS boys) TBA
FMS basketball at Cunningham 3:00 pm
FHS League Scholar's Bowl at Stafford
 Friday
1/19
FMS Movie Night at 3:30
Saturday
1/20
Burrton Tournament (FHS boys) TBA


Remember to check the DISTRICT CALENDAR for ALL upcoming activities and events!

 

Superintendent's Message

Fairfield Parents and Community,

Successful schools begin by engaging students and making sure they come to school regularly. That may seem obvious. What’s less obvious is that the consequences of low attendance are serious for all children and for the community, not just the students who miss school. School attendance data on GreatSchools.org (which comes from the Kansas State Department of Education or KSDE) gives you baseline information on the quality of a school. The type of data displayed depends on what each state Department of Education makes available.

What does the attendance rate tell you about a school?

The attendance rate tells you the average percentage of students attending school each day in the given year, as reported by the KSDE. (Some states report this attendance rate as the percentage of students with unexcused absences.) You can also see the state average for the attendance rate and compare how your school stacks up. In some states, you will see the mobility rate (which means the percentage of students who transfer out of the school). Most schools have high attendance rates. If your school’s attendance rate is below the state average, the school may face challenges in getting students to come to school regularly. Ask the principal why the attendance rate is lower than the state average and what the school is doing to address this issue.

How important is attendance?

The attendance rate is important because students are more likely to succeed in academics when they attend school consistently. It’s difficult for the teacher and the class to build their skills and progress if a large number of students are frequently absent. In addition to falling behind in academics, students who are not in school on a regular basis are more likely to get into trouble with the law and cause problems in their communities.

A 2008 study conducted by the Rodel Community Scholars at Arizona State University that tracked students from kindergarten through high school found that dropout patterns were linked with poor attendance, beginning in kindergarten. Gregory Hickman, director of the Rodel Community Scholars program and former director of the Arizona Dropout Initiative, notes they discovered that as early as kindergarten, behavioral differences are apparent between those who go on to graduate and those who drop out, with dropouts missing an average of 124 days by eighth grade.

School budgets may suffer when students don’t attend. In many states, school budgets are based on the average daily attendance at a school. If many students enrolled at a school fail to consistently attend, the school has less money to pay for essential classroom needs.

How can we, as schools increase their attendance rate?

According to the National Center for Student Engagement, schools are most effective in achieving high attendance rates when parents, school leaders and community members work together to focus on reducing absences and truancy, and keeping kids in schools. The center’s website provides 10 tips for schools and communities to improve their attendance rates. Among them:

• Make the school a place where parents and students feel welcome.
• Forge a relationship with local law enforcement and make them allies in showing the community, family and students that school is the place to be.
• Forge a relationship with local businesses so that they cooperate in encouraging students to go to school and not congregate at businesses during school hours.
• Call parents – not an answering machine – when their children are not in school to let them know the school is concerned.
• Talk to students about why they were gone and let them know they were missed.
What other factors should you consider when evaluating your school?
The attendance rate is just one factor to consider when sizing up your school. You’ll want to look at the test scores, student-teacher ratio, Parent Reviews and other data that you can find on GreatSchools.org. You’ll also want to find out more about the school climate, quality of school leadership, parent involvement and other factors that aren’t apparent from school data.

Questions parents should ask

If you are concerned about the attendance rate at your school, here are some questions you might ask your principal and your school site council:
• Does the school provide a welcoming atmosphere for students and parents?
• Do students feel safe at school?
• What actions does the school take to follow up on students who are absent?
• Do teachers call parents when students are frequently absent?
• Does the school know why students are absent? The school cannot address the problem if administrators don’t understand the causes.
• Has the school taken steps to forge a positive relationship with local law enforcement, business and community members to work together to encourage students to come to school?
• Does the school reward students for good attendance?
• What can parents do to help the school encourage all students to attend?

This information comes from an article by Great Schools staff, an online resource for parents.  I thought it very informative and wanted to share with our readers.  Attendance is the most basic predictor of success in schools.  Let us do our part to ensure all students have their best opportunity to be successful.


Dr. Nathan Reed
Superintendent, Fairfield School District 310

What's Happening

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Opportunities and Deadlines in January
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Ho-ho-ho and Happy 2018! The first semester has flown by and the second semester will likely fly by as quickly! Click to read about opportunities wit ...
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Construction
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Posted on 08/02/2017
Construction has started at the Fairfield campus! Click below for road closure and updates. ...
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